anarcho-queer:

Study Reveals It Costs Much Less to House The Homeless Than to Leave Them on the Street 
Not only is it morally wrong to let people live desperately on the streets, but it doesn’t make much economical sense either.
A new study has found that it’s significantly cheaper to house the homeless than leave them on the streets.
University of North Carolina Charlotte researchers released a study on Monday that tracked chronically homeless adults housed in the Moore Place facility run by Charlotte’s Urban Ministry Center (UMC) in partnership with local government. Housing these people led to dramatic cost savings that more than paid for the cost of putting them in decent housing, including $1.8 million in health care savings from 447 fewer ER visits (78% reduction) and 372 fewer hospital days (79% reduction). Tenants also spent 84 fewer days in jail, with a 72% drop in arrests.
Moore Place cost $6 million in land and construction costs, and tenants are required to contribute 30% of their income (mainly benefits) towards rent. The remainder of the $14,000 per tenant annually is covered by donations and local and federal funding. According to the UNCC study, that $14,000 pales in comparison to the costs a chronically homeless person racks up every year to society — a stunning $39,458 in combined medical, judicial and other costs.
What’s more, Moore Place is enabling the formerly homeless to find their own sources of income. Without housing, just 50% were able to generate any income. One year after move-in, they’re up to 82%. And after an average length of 7 years of homelessness, 94% of the original tenants retained their housing after 18 months, with a 99% rent collection rate.
The general population is biased: The original proposal for Moore Place was “controversial, if not ridiculed,” according to the Charlotte Observer. Locals mocked the idea that giving the homeless subsidized housing would do any good. A 2011 report commissioned by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority found that people have condescending attitudes towards the homeless, with the public perceiving higher levels of substance abuse problems (91%) and mental health issues (85%) than reported by the homeless themselves (41% and 24% respectively). It concluded that if “personal failings as the main cause of homelessness, it is unlikely that they will vote for increased public assistance or volunteer to help the homeless themselves.”
But “you can’t argue with the statistics," said UMC housing director Caroline Chambre. “This approach was controversial at one time because of the stereotype of who the homeless are, and we had to change that stereotype.”
In 2012, total welfare spending for the poor was just 0.47% of the federal budget. It turns out that maybe if we spent a little more to help the chronically destitute solve their problems, we could save a lot of money.

anarcho-queer:

Study Reveals It Costs Much Less to House The Homeless Than to Leave Them on the Street 
Not only is it morally wrong to let people live desperately on the streets, but it doesn’t make much economical sense either.
A new study has found that it’s significantly cheaper to house the homeless than leave them on the streets.
University of North Carolina Charlotte researchers released a study on Monday that tracked chronically homeless adults housed in the Moore Place facility run by Charlotte’s Urban Ministry Center (UMC) in partnership with local government. Housing these people led to dramatic cost savings that more than paid for the cost of putting them in decent housing, including $1.8 million in health care savings from 447 fewer ER visits (78% reduction) and 372 fewer hospital days (79% reduction). Tenants also spent 84 fewer days in jail, with a 72% drop in arrests.
Moore Place cost $6 million in land and construction costs, and tenants are required to contribute 30% of their income (mainly benefits) towards rent. The remainder of the $14,000 per tenant annually is covered by donations and local and federal funding. According to the UNCC study, that $14,000 pales in comparison to the costs a chronically homeless person racks up every year to society — a stunning $39,458 in combined medical, judicial and other costs.
What’s more, Moore Place is enabling the formerly homeless to find their own sources of income. Without housing, just 50% were able to generate any income. One year after move-in, they’re up to 82%. And after an average length of 7 years of homelessness, 94% of the original tenants retained their housing after 18 months, with a 99% rent collection rate.
The general population is biased: The original proposal for Moore Place was “controversial, if not ridiculed,” according to the Charlotte Observer. Locals mocked the idea that giving the homeless subsidized housing would do any good. A 2011 report commissioned by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority found that people have condescending attitudes towards the homeless, with the public perceiving higher levels of substance abuse problems (91%) and mental health issues (85%) than reported by the homeless themselves (41% and 24% respectively). It concluded that if “personal failings as the main cause of homelessness, it is unlikely that they will vote for increased public assistance or volunteer to help the homeless themselves.”
But “you can’t argue with the statistics," said UMC housing director Caroline Chambre. “This approach was controversial at one time because of the stereotype of who the homeless are, and we had to change that stereotype.”
In 2012, total welfare spending for the poor was just 0.47% of the federal budget. It turns out that maybe if we spent a little more to help the chronically destitute solve their problems, we could save a lot of money.

anarcho-queer:

Study Reveals It Costs Much Less to House The Homeless Than to Leave Them on the Street

Not only is it morally wrong to let people live desperately on the streets, but it doesn’t make much economical sense either.

A new study has found that it’s significantly cheaper to house the homeless than leave them on the streets.

University of North Carolina Charlotte researchers released a study on Monday that tracked chronically homeless adults housed in the Moore Place facility run by Charlotte’s Urban Ministry Center (UMC) in partnership with local government. Housing these people led to dramatic cost savings that more than paid for the cost of putting them in decent housing, including $1.8 million in health care savings from 447 fewer ER visits (78% reduction) and 372 fewer hospital days (79% reduction). Tenants also spent 84 fewer days in jail, with a 72% drop in arrests.

Moore Place cost $6 million in land and construction costs, and tenants are required to contribute 30% of their income (mainly benefits) towards rent. The remainder of the $14,000 per tenant annually is covered by donations and local and federal funding. According to the UNCC study, that $14,000 pales in comparison to the costs a chronically homeless person racks up every year to society — a stunning $39,458 in combined medical, judicial and other costs.

What’s more, Moore Place is enabling the formerly homeless to find their own sources of income. Without housing, just 50% were able to generate any income. One year after move-in, they’re up to 82%. And after an average length of 7 years of homelessness, 94% of the original tenants retained their housing after 18 months, with a 99% rent collection rate.

The general population is biased: The original proposal for Moore Place was “controversial, if not ridiculed,” according to the Charlotte Observer. Locals mocked the idea that giving the homeless subsidized housing would do any good. A 2011 report commissioned by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority found that people have condescending attitudes towards the homeless, with the public perceiving higher levels of substance abuse problems (91%) and mental health issues (85%) than reported by the homeless themselves (41% and 24% respectively). It concluded that if “personal failings as the main cause of homelessness, it is unlikely that they will vote for increased public assistance or volunteer to help the homeless themselves.

But “you can’t argue with the statistics," said UMC housing director Caroline Chambre. “This approach was controversial at one time because of the stereotype of who the homeless are, and we had to change that stereotype.

In 2012, total welfare spending for the poor was just 0.47% of the federal budget. It turns out that maybe if we spent a little more to help the chronically destitute solve their problems, we could save a lot of money.

(via big-gadje-world)

(Source: stunningpicture, via mercurieux)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/eforelizabeth/8426893389/

(Source: audreyhepburncomplex, via mercurieux)

(Source: amourvisualise, via mercurieux)

So little of what could happen does happen.

Salvador Dalí  (via throwouttheclock)

(Source: larmoyante, via bakerie)

bluepueblo:

Country Cottage, Lake District, England
photo via anna
http://bluepueblo.tumblr.com/

bluepueblo:

Country Cottage, Lake District, England

photo via anna

(via fuckitandmovetobritain)

wanderthewood:

Seven Sisters, East Sussex, England by Alan MacKenzie
https://www.flickr.com/photos/32768071@N06/14371172683/

wanderthewood:

Seven Sisters, East Sussex, England by Alan MacKenzie

(via fuckitandmovetobritain)

I work in a health food/supplement store. Every week at least 75% of people looking for a natural treatment of their illness, are suffering from inflammation and their doctor is prescribing harsh medications to deal with the side-effects of their inflammation instead of just treating the inflammation. Unlike most other people I work with, I always make sure to tell people to trust their doctors and not choose natural remedies against their doctors advice, especially if they have a serious illness. But coming from a family that has many people suffering some form of autoimmune disease, and having frequent inflammation myself, I try to let people know about this as much as I can. There’s a lot more to an anti-inflammation diet than what is mentioned in the above picture, but this is a very good start. I would add as well, with grains it is not so much the gluten that upsets most people’s digestion, but the phytic acid in grains, seeds, nuts, beans, lentils etc. They need to be soaked/sprouted to decrease the phytic acid to safe levels and make them much more digestible. Gluten intolerance is actually much rarer than people think.

I work in a health food/supplement store. Every week at least 75% of people looking for a natural treatment of their illness, are suffering from inflammation and their doctor is prescribing harsh medications to deal with the side-effects of their inflammation instead of just treating the inflammation.
Unlike most other people I work with, I always make sure to tell people to trust their doctors and not choose natural remedies against their doctors advice, especially if they have a serious illness. But coming from a family that has many people suffering some form of autoimmune disease, and having frequent inflammation myself, I try to let people know about this as much as I can.

There’s a lot more to an anti-inflammation diet than what is mentioned in the above picture, but this is a very good start. I would add as well, with grains it is not so much the gluten that upsets most people’s digestion, but the phytic acid in grains, seeds, nuts, beans, lentils etc. They need to be soaked/sprouted to decrease the phytic acid to safe levels and make them much more digestible. Gluten intolerance is actually much rarer than people think.

(Source: pinterest.com, via all-the-spoonie-love)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/zwgggrs/7451988110/in/set-72157626877731354

(Source: viage, via dollyribbon)

sizvideos:

Fawn Rescue - Video

sizvideos:

Fawn Rescue - Video

sizvideos:

Fawn Rescue - Video

sizvideos:

Fawn Rescue - Video

sizvideos:

Fawn Rescue - Video

sizvideos:

Fawn Rescue - Video

sizvideos:

Fawn Rescue - Video

sizvideos:

Fawn Rescue - Video

(via theblacksmithsdaughter)

discourseofwalls:

fasttoslow:

This is important

This graphic is ridiculously effective and helpful.

discourseofwalls:

fasttoslow:

This is important

This graphic is ridiculously effective and helpful.

(via theblacksmithsdaughter)

africa-makanaka:

amphibium:

afrorevolution:

bellecosby:

beautiesofafrique:

African barbie dolls
I wish I had these when I was younger


the dolls my future children are getting

I need

I had the third one… And I loved her dearly. <3

http://africa-makanaka.tumblr.com

these are so awesome…I don’t plan on having children but now I feel the urge to look into what other ethnicities are represented this nicely. I’m glad these are available to POC, though I’m curious where they can be found. Growing up in the UK I never saw much of anything besides the standard white Barbies, at least none that were specific ethnicities. Now there are a lot more POC in my hometown than there were when I was a kid, so I hope it’s easy enough for people to find stuff like this now. Toy stores should stock dolls made for POC in a way that reflects the % of POC in the area, not just assume ‘most people’ want white dolls. White Barbie should not be the standard.

africa-makanaka:

amphibium:

afrorevolution:

bellecosby:

beautiesofafrique:

African barbie dolls
I wish I had these when I was younger


the dolls my future children are getting

I need

I had the third one… And I loved her dearly. <3

http://africa-makanaka.tumblr.com

these are so awesome…I don’t plan on having children but now I feel the urge to look into what other ethnicities are represented this nicely. I’m glad these are available to POC, though I’m curious where they can be found. Growing up in the UK I never saw much of anything besides the standard white Barbies, at least none that were specific ethnicities. Now there are a lot more POC in my hometown than there were when I was a kid, so I hope it’s easy enough for people to find stuff like this now. Toy stores should stock dolls made for POC in a way that reflects the % of POC in the area, not just assume ‘most people’ want white dolls. White Barbie should not be the standard.

africa-makanaka:

amphibium:

afrorevolution:

bellecosby:

beautiesofafrique:

African barbie dolls
I wish I had these when I was younger


the dolls my future children are getting

I need

I had the third one… And I loved her dearly. <3

http://africa-makanaka.tumblr.com

these are so awesome…I don’t plan on having children but now I feel the urge to look into what other ethnicities are represented this nicely. I’m glad these are available to POC, though I’m curious where they can be found. Growing up in the UK I never saw much of anything besides the standard white Barbies, at least none that were specific ethnicities. Now there are a lot more POC in my hometown than there were when I was a kid, so I hope it’s easy enough for people to find stuff like this now. Toy stores should stock dolls made for POC in a way that reflects the % of POC in the area, not just assume ‘most people’ want white dolls. White Barbie should not be the standard.

africa-makanaka:

amphibium:

afrorevolution:

bellecosby:

beautiesofafrique:

African barbie dolls
I wish I had these when I was younger


the dolls my future children are getting

I need

I had the third one… And I loved her dearly. <3

http://africa-makanaka.tumblr.com

these are so awesome…I don’t plan on having children but now I feel the urge to look into what other ethnicities are represented this nicely. I’m glad these are available to POC, though I’m curious where they can be found. Growing up in the UK I never saw much of anything besides the standard white Barbies, at least none that were specific ethnicities. Now there are a lot more POC in my hometown than there were when I was a kid, so I hope it’s easy enough for people to find stuff like this now. Toy stores should stock dolls made for POC in a way that reflects the % of POC in the area, not just assume ‘most people’ want white dolls. White Barbie should not be the standard.

africa-makanaka:

amphibium:

afrorevolution:

bellecosby:

beautiesofafrique:

African barbie dolls
I wish I had these when I was younger


the dolls my future children are getting

I need

I had the third one… And I loved her dearly. <3

http://africa-makanaka.tumblr.com

these are so awesome…I don’t plan on having children but now I feel the urge to look into what other ethnicities are represented this nicely. I’m glad these are available to POC, though I’m curious where they can be found. Growing up in the UK I never saw much of anything besides the standard white Barbies, at least none that were specific ethnicities. Now there are a lot more POC in my hometown than there were when I was a kid, so I hope it’s easy enough for people to find stuff like this now. Toy stores should stock dolls made for POC in a way that reflects the % of POC in the area, not just assume ‘most people’ want white dolls. White Barbie should not be the standard.

africa-makanaka:

amphibium:

afrorevolution:

bellecosby:

beautiesofafrique:

African barbie dolls
I wish I had these when I was younger


the dolls my future children are getting

I need

I had the third one… And I loved her dearly. <3

http://africa-makanaka.tumblr.com

these are so awesome…I don’t plan on having children but now I feel the urge to look into what other ethnicities are represented this nicely. I’m glad these are available to POC, though I’m curious where they can be found. Growing up in the UK I never saw much of anything besides the standard white Barbies, at least none that were specific ethnicities. Now there are a lot more POC in my hometown than there were when I was a kid, so I hope it’s easy enough for people to find stuff like this now. Toy stores should stock dolls made for POC in a way that reflects the % of POC in the area, not just assume ‘most people’ want white dolls. White Barbie should not be the standard.

africa-makanaka:

amphibium:

afrorevolution:

bellecosby:

beautiesofafrique:

African barbie dolls
I wish I had these when I was younger


the dolls my future children are getting

I need

I had the third one… And I loved her dearly. <3

http://africa-makanaka.tumblr.com

these are so awesome…I don’t plan on having children but now I feel the urge to look into what other ethnicities are represented this nicely. I’m glad these are available to POC, though I’m curious where they can be found. Growing up in the UK I never saw much of anything besides the standard white Barbies, at least none that were specific ethnicities. Now there are a lot more POC in my hometown than there were when I was a kid, so I hope it’s easy enough for people to find stuff like this now. Toy stores should stock dolls made for POC in a way that reflects the % of POC in the area, not just assume ‘most people’ want white dolls. White Barbie should not be the standard.

africa-makanaka:

amphibium:

afrorevolution:

bellecosby:

beautiesofafrique:

African barbie dolls
I wish I had these when I was younger


the dolls my future children are getting

I need

I had the third one… And I loved her dearly. <3

http://africa-makanaka.tumblr.com

these are so awesome…I don’t plan on having children but now I feel the urge to look into what other ethnicities are represented this nicely. I’m glad these are available to POC, though I’m curious where they can be found. Growing up in the UK I never saw much of anything besides the standard white Barbies, at least none that were specific ethnicities. Now there are a lot more POC in my hometown than there were when I was a kid, so I hope it’s easy enough for people to find stuff like this now. Toy stores should stock dolls made for POC in a way that reflects the % of POC in the area, not just assume ‘most people’ want white dolls. White Barbie should not be the standard.

africa-makanaka:

amphibium:

afrorevolution:

bellecosby:

beautiesofafrique:

African barbie dolls
I wish I had these when I was younger


the dolls my future children are getting

I need

I had the third one… And I loved her dearly. <3

http://africa-makanaka.tumblr.com

these are so awesome…I don’t plan on having children but now I feel the urge to look into what other ethnicities are represented this nicely. I’m glad these are available to POC, though I’m curious where they can be found. Growing up in the UK I never saw much of anything besides the standard white Barbies, at least none that were specific ethnicities. Now there are a lot more POC in my hometown than there were when I was a kid, so I hope it’s easy enough for people to find stuff like this now. Toy stores should stock dolls made for POC in a way that reflects the % of POC in the area, not just assume ‘most people’ want white dolls. White Barbie should not be the standard.

africa-makanaka:

amphibium:

afrorevolution:

bellecosby:

beautiesofafrique:

African barbie dolls
I wish I had these when I was younger


the dolls my future children are getting

I need

I had the third one… And I loved her dearly. <3

http://africa-makanaka.tumblr.com

these are so awesome…I don’t plan on having children but now I feel the urge to look into what other ethnicities are represented this nicely. I’m glad these are available to POC, though I’m curious where they can be found. Growing up in the UK I never saw much of anything besides the standard white Barbies, at least none that were specific ethnicities. Now there are a lot more POC in my hometown than there were when I was a kid, so I hope it’s easy enough for people to find stuff like this now. Toy stores should stock dolls made for POC in a way that reflects the % of POC in the area, not just assume ‘most people’ want white dolls. White Barbie should not be the standard.

africa-makanaka:

amphibium:

afrorevolution:

bellecosby:

beautiesofafrique:

African barbie dolls

I wish I had these when I was younger

image

the dolls my future children are getting

I need

I had the third one… And I loved her dearly. <3

http://africa-makanaka.tumblr.com

these are so awesome…I don’t plan on having children but now I feel the urge to look into what other ethnicities are represented this nicely. I’m glad these are available to POC, though I’m curious where they can be found. Growing up in the UK I never saw much of anything besides the standard white Barbies, at least none that were specific ethnicities. Now there are a lot more POC in my hometown than there were when I was a kid, so I hope it’s easy enough for people to find stuff like this now. Toy stores should stock dolls made for POC in a way that reflects the % of POC in the area, not just assume ‘most people’ want white dolls. White Barbie should not be the standard.

(via theblacksmithsdaughter)

If you’re searching for that one person that will change your life, take a look in the mirror.

it’s you. (via theba-na-natimes)

(via ginandbird)

So I was talking to my white conservative boss yesterday about racism and ableism in the media.

Me: Okay, Sherry, I'm white, right? I have no bias against white people due to my race. Make sense?

Her: Yeah, okay...

Me: Look at that news headline. Look at what they're saying about why this dude killed those people.

Her: He was mentally ill. I don't see where you're going.

Me: Ok, backtrack. Let's say a Muslim man kills 6 people and injures 13 in a shooting rampage, and leaves a 137 page manifesto explaining that it was because a girl turned him down when he was younger. Why do you think he did it?

Her: He's a terrorist who hates women.

Me: Right. Let's say a black man does the exact same thing. How does the media portray it?

Her: He's a woman-hating gangbanger or a thug...

Me: You're catching on. Now think back to every white boy in the past ten years that has shot up a school or a public place of some sort. What is it always blamed on?

Her: Mental illness...

Me: Exactly. And I would like to point out a couple final things there. First: this guy was going to therapy for years and had no diagnosis of mental illness. The closest we can get is that his family SUSPECTED he might be on the autism spectrum. Sherry, I'm autistic. My brother's autistic. I have several close friends who are autistic. None of us have ever shown a propensity for killing people. Secondly: mental illness doesn't discriminate based on race. You know what does?

Her: ...

Her: Damn. The media is racist as hell, isn't it?

Me: ...there ya go.

halftheskymovement:

"You lose your childhood really, your innocence is snatched away, and what little is left of that once-pure child is now being transformed into a sexual being, a child with knowledge of things way before her time," writes South African photojournalist Mariella Furrer in her new book, My Piece of Sky.
The 700-page volume features heart-wrenching images, conversations, artwork and poetry documenting child sex abuse and its horrific impact on the lives of the victims as well as society at large. 
Read more via Daily Mail.

halftheskymovement:

"You lose your childhood really, your innocence is snatched away, and what little is left of that once-pure child is now being transformed into a sexual being, a child with knowledge of things way before her time," writes South African photojournalist Mariella Furrer in her new book, My Piece of Sky.
The 700-page volume features heart-wrenching images, conversations, artwork and poetry documenting child sex abuse and its horrific impact on the lives of the victims as well as society at large. 
Read more via Daily Mail.

halftheskymovement:

"You lose your childhood really, your innocence is snatched away, and what little is left of that once-pure child is now being transformed into a sexual being, a child with knowledge of things way before her time," writes South African photojournalist Mariella Furrer in her new book, My Piece of Sky.
The 700-page volume features heart-wrenching images, conversations, artwork and poetry documenting child sex abuse and its horrific impact on the lives of the victims as well as society at large. 
Read more via Daily Mail.

halftheskymovement:

"You lose your childhood really, your innocence is snatched away, and what little is left of that once-pure child is now being transformed into a sexual being, a child with knowledge of things way before her time," writes South African photojournalist Mariella Furrer in her new book, My Piece of Sky.
The 700-page volume features heart-wrenching images, conversations, artwork and poetry documenting child sex abuse and its horrific impact on the lives of the victims as well as society at large. 
Read more via Daily Mail.

halftheskymovement:

"You lose your childhood really, your innocence is snatched away, and what little is left of that once-pure child is now being transformed into a sexual being, a child with knowledge of things way before her time," writes South African photojournalist Mariella Furrer in her new book, My Piece of Sky.

The 700-page volume features heart-wrenching images, conversations, artwork and poetry documenting child sex abuse and its horrific impact on the lives of the victims as well as society at large. 

Read more via Daily Mail.